Calendar Year Experience

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DEFINITION of 'Calendar Year Experience'

The underwriting result based on earned premiums and booked incurred losses for the same calendar-year accounting period. This term is used in the insurance industry to signify an insurance company's "experience" during a calendar year, in terms of the premiums earned and the losses incurred. Losses incurred refer to claims paid out during the year and changes to the loss reserves.



Also referred to as accident year experience and underwriting year experience.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Calendar Year Experience'

Underwriting can be defined as the process of insuring someone. Insurance underwriters usually assess a client, decide how much coverage the client should receive, how much the clients should pay for the coverage or whether to accept the risk and insure them. Underwriting involves measuring risk exposure and determining the premium that needs to be charged to insure that risk.

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