Calendar Spread

What is a 'Calendar Spread'

A calendar spread is an options or futures spread established by simultaneously entering a long and short position on the same underlying asset but with different delivery months. Sometimes referred to as an interdelivery, intramarket, time or horizontal spread.

BREAKING DOWN 'Calendar Spread'

An example of a calendar spread would be going long on a crude oil futures contract with delivery next month and going short on a crude oil futures contract whose delivery is in six months.

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