Calendar Year


DEFINITION of 'Calendar Year'

The one-year period that begins on January 1 and ends on December 31, based on the commonly used Gregorian calendar. For individual and corporate taxation purposes, a calendar year will generally comprise all of the year's financial information used to calculate income tax payable.

BREAKING DOWN 'Calendar Year'

Most individuals and many companies use the calendar year as their fiscal year, or the one-year period on which their payable taxes are calculated. However, some companies choose to report their taxes based on a fiscal year (e.g. starting on April 1 and ending on March 31) to better conform to seasonality patterns or other accounting concerns applicable to their businesses.

  1. Calendar Year Experience

    The underwriting result based on earned premiums and booked incurred ...
  2. Spillover Dividend

    A type of dividend in which the payment year and the taxable ...
  3. Last Fiscal Year - LFY

    The most recent 12-month accounting period that a business uses ...
  4. Tax Year

    The period of time which is covered by a particular tax return. ...
  5. Year

    A period of time that is comprised of 12 consecutive months. ...
  6. Fiscal Year - FY

    A period that a company or government uses for accounting purposes ...
Related Articles
  1. Entrepreneurship

    New Year Planning For Business Owners

    Make a resolution to start your business off on the right foot in the new year.
  2. Taxes

    Don't Put Off Your Year-End Tax Plan

    From sales tax deductions to credit reports, check out what items should be on your financial checklist.
  3. Taxes

    3 Common Tax Questions Answered

    We clarify some rules that often puzzle taxpayers.
  4. Economics

    Calculating Days Working Capital

    A company’s days working capital ratio shows how many days it takes to convert working capital into revenue.
  5. Economics

    Explaining Corporate Tax

    A corporate tax is a tax levied on the profits a corporation generates.
  6. Professionals

    Career Advice: Accountant Vs. Controller

    Learn about the differences between controllers and accountants, how the two are related and which is the best career choice for aspiring bookkeepers.
  7. Professionals

    What is Cash Basis Accounting?

    Cash basis accounting recognizes revenues and expenses at the time cash is paid or received.
  8. Entrepreneurship

    What's a Good Profit Margin for a Mature Business?

    How to determine if the amount you clear dovetails with the competition.
  9. Taxes

    Countries With The Highest & Lowest Corporate Tax Rates

    The United States is No. 2 in the world for its high corporate tax rate. There are ways around paying it, and many nations with lower rates are worse off.
  10. Entrepreneurship

    START-UP NY: How a Tax-Free Zone Would Work

    START-UP NY is an initiative designed to attract companies to New York State by giving them 10 years of tax breaks. Sounds good, but is it a success?
  1. Why do companies report earnings at different times?

    This is a question that puzzles many people because, unlike individuals, who must file their taxes to the IRS every year ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Does working capital include salaries?

    A company accrues unpaid salaries on its balance sheet as part of accounts payable, which is a current liability account, ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Why is Luxembourg considered a tax haven?

    Luxembourg has been the tax haven of choice for many corporations and mega-rich individuals around the world since the 197 ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Do financial advisors prepare tax returns for clients?

    Financial advisors engage in a wide variety of financial areas, including tax return preparation and tax planning for their ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is a profit and loss (P&L) statement and why do companies publish them?

    A profit and loss (P&L) statement, or balance sheet, is essentially a snapshot of a company's financial activity for ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How do dividends affect the balance sheet?

    Dividends paid in cash affect a company's balance sheet by decreasing the company's cash account on the asset side and decreasing ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Capitalization Rate

    The rate of return on a real estate investment property based on the income that the property is expected to generate.
  2. Gross Profit

    A company's total revenue (equivalent to total sales) minus the cost of goods sold. Gross profit is the profit a company ...
  3. Revenue

    The amount of money that a company actually receives during a specific period, including discounts and deductions for returned ...
  4. Normal Profit

    An economic condition occurring when the difference between a firm’s total revenue and total cost is equal to zero.
  5. Operating Cost

    Expenses associated with the maintenance and administration of a business on a day-to-day basis.
  6. Cost Of Funds

    The interest rate paid by financial institutions for the funds that they deploy in their business. The cost of funds is one ...
Trading Center
You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!