Callable Security

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DEFINITION of 'Callable Security'

A security with an embedded call provision that allows the issuer to repurchase or redeem the security by a specified date. Since the holder of a callable security is exposed to the risk of the security being repurchased, the callable security is generally less expensive than comparable securities that do not have a call provision.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Callable Security'

The conditions of the call provision are established at the time the security is issued. Callable securities are commonly found in the fixed-income markets and allow the issuer to protect itself from overpaying for debt.

For example, a bond issuer may choose to redeem a certain issue when the current market rate falls below the coupon rate of the bond by a set amount. This allows the issuer to reissue the bonds at a lower rate and avoid paying a higher interest rate.

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