Call Report

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DEFINITION of 'Call Report'

A report that must be filed by all regulated financial institutions in the U.S. on a quarterly basis and contains financial information about the banks. Banks are required to file no later than 30 days after the end of each quarter. The report is officially known as the Report of Condition and Income for banks and Thrift Financial Report for Thrifts.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Call Report'

The Call Report collects such basic financial information as the bank's balance sheet and income statement. Reports are required to be submitted to the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council (FFIEC). The FFIEC is an inter agency entity and coordinates between the Federal Reserve, the FDIC and the Office of Thrift Supervision. Banks and Thrifts must use the standardized forms provided by the FFIEC to submit their data and each Call Report is audited by an FDIC analyst for errors and audit flags. These reports are available to the public on the FDIC website.

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