Call Report

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Call Report'

A report that must be filed by all regulated financial institutions in the U.S. on a quarterly basis and contains financial information about the banks. Banks are required to file no later than 30 days after the end of each quarter. The report is officially known as the Report of Condition and Income for banks and Thrift Financial Report for Thrifts.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Call Report'

The Call Report collects such basic financial information as the bank's balance sheet and income statement. Reports are required to be submitted to the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council (FFIEC). The FFIEC is an inter agency entity and coordinates between the Federal Reserve, the FDIC and the Office of Thrift Supervision. Banks and Thrifts must use the standardized forms provided by the FFIEC to submit their data and each Call Report is audited by an FDIC analyst for errors and audit flags. These reports are available to the public on the FDIC website.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Primary Regulator

    The state or federal regulatory agency that is the primary supervising ...
  2. Big Five Banks

    A reference used in Canada to describe Royal Bank, The Bank of ...
  3. Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation ...

    The U.S. corporation insuring deposits in the U.S. against bank ...
  4. Associate Bank

    A bank that is affiliated, usually through membership, in a regional ...
  5. Office Of Thrift Supervision - ...

    The bureau of the U.S. Treasury Department that is responsible ...
  6. Chartered Bank

    A financial institution whose primary roles are to accept and ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. Can a business ever be too small to issue commercial paper?

    There are effective – though not legal – restrictions on the size of commercial paper issuers. Any company can issue commercial ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What does inventory turnover tell an investor about a company?

    The inventory turnover ratio determines the number of times a company's inventory is sold and replaced over a certain period. ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What is a deferred tax liability?

    A deferred tax liability is an account that is listed on a company's balance sheet and occurs when its taxable income is ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What are the pros and cons of using the fixed charge coverage ratio?

    One main advantage of using the fixed-charge coverage ratio is it provides a good, fundamental assessment for lenders or ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What are the disadvantages of using the sinking fund method to depreciate an asset?

    Using the sinking fund depreciation definitely impinges on a company's cash flow and profitability during the depreciation ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How does inventory accounting differ between GAAP and IFRS?

    There are three common methods for inventory accountability costs: weighted-average cost method; first in, first out, or ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Fundamental Analysis

    Analyzing A Bank's Financial Statements

    A careful review of a bank's financial statements can help you identify key factors in a potential investment.
  2. Savings

    Are Your Bank Deposits Insured?

    Learn how the FDIC is helping to keep your money in your pockets.
  3. Personal Finance

    Using Economic Capital To Determine Risk

    Discover how banks and financial institutions use economic capital to enhance risk management.
  4. Insurance

    Basel II Accord To Guard Against Financial Shocks

    Problems with the original accord became evident during the subprime crisis in 2007.
  5. Personal Finance

    How Basel 1 Affected Banks

    This 1988 agreement sought to decrease the potential for bankruptcy among major international banks.
  6. Options & Futures

    Bank Failure: Will Your Assets Be Protected?

    The SIPC and FDIC insure against personal financial ruin when banks or brokerages go belly up.
  7. Investing

    Apple or Google: Which is the Better Bet?

    Apple and Google have made many investors rich since the turn of the century. Which is more appealing going forward?
  8. Economics

    What is Involved in Inventory Management?

    Inventory management refers to the theories, functions and management skills involved in controlling an inventory.
  9. Economics

    What are Noncurrent Assets?

    Noncurrent assets are property that a company owns that will last for more than one year.
  10. Fundamental Analysis

    How Microsoft & Apple's Balance Sheets Compare

    Looking at two iconic companies, Microsoft and Apple, whose balance is sheet is stronger and where?

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Yield Curve

    A line that plots the interest rates, at a set point in time, of bonds having equal credit quality, but differing maturity ...
  2. Productivity

    An economic measure of output per unit of input. Inputs include labor and capital, while output is typically measured in ...
  3. Variance

    The spread between numbers in a data set, measuring Variance is calculated by taking the differences between each number ...
  4. Terminal Value - TV

    The value of a bond at maturity, or of an asset at a specified, future valuation date, taking into account factors such as ...
  5. Rule Of 70

    A way to estimate the number of years it takes for a certain variable to double. The rule of 70 states that in order to estimate ...
  6. Risk Premium

    The return in excess of the risk-free rate of return that an investment is expected to yield. An asset's risk premium is ...
Trading Center