Camouflage Compensation

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DEFINITION of 'Camouflage Compensation'

Compensation that is granted to upper echelon employees, directors, consultants and related parties that is not fully disclosed in mandatory company filings. In some cases of camouflage compensation, the compensation is fully disclosed, but in such a way that it is very difficult for the average investor to decipher the true value of gross pay compensation.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Camouflage Compensation'

Non-qualified deferred compensation plans, SERPs, stock options, stock appreciation rights and share grants are all potential places where compensation can be hidden from analysts and shareholders. The SEC has proposed new regulations to more completely disclose the full cost of compensation to related parties, consultants, directors and employees.

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