Canada Learning Bond

DEFINITION of 'Canada Learning Bond'

This bond is intended to help low-income families pay for higher education expenses. The Canada Learning Bond is funded by the Canadian government as part of a program to help less privileged families send their children to college. This bond has a maximum benefit of $2,000 per child.

BREAKING DOWN 'Canada Learning Bond'

The Canada Learning Bond was instituted in 2004 by the Canadian Minister of Finance. Unfortunately, only a small percentage of eligible Canadian families took advantage of this program. As a result, the government has made efforts to increase publicity for the bond. This program depends largely on the National Child Benefit Program to determine eligibility for aid.

RELATED TERMS
  1. 529 Plan

    529 is a category of plans that provide tax advantages when saving ...
  2. Bond

    A debt investment in which an investor loans money to an entity ...
  3. Lifelong Learning Plan

    A provision applicable to the Canadian Registered Retirement ...
  4. Qualified Higher Education Expense

    Expenses such as tuition and tuition related expenses that an ...
  5. Loan

    The act of giving money, property or other material goods to ...
  6. Full-Time Student

    A status that is important for determining dependency exemptions. ...
Related Articles
  1. Savings

    Don't Forget The Kids: Save For Their Education And Retirement

    Retirement and education financing are the two most important planning items for taxpayers.
  2. Economics

    Invest In Yourself With A College Education

    Spending a few thousand dollars on school could help you earn millions more.
  3. Insurance

    Investing In Your Child's Education

    Overwhelmed by increasing tuition costs for your kids? The U.S. government can help.
  4. Savings

    Choosing The Right 529 Education Savings Plan

    Before you fund one of these education-savings vehicles, be sure you know their differences.
  5. Economics

    4 Countries Pleading for Higher Commodity Prices

    Discover what countries are struggling the most from the price collapse in commodities and what these countries require to return to economic growth.
  6. Investing

    Does BlackBerry Have What It Takes To Succeed? (BBRY)

    The last several years have been tough for BlackBerry shareholders. With the company in the midst of an attempted turnaround, we examine their progress.
  7. Personal Finance

    University Donations: Which Schools Got the Most

    A closer look at the staggering $40.3 billion donated to colleges and universities in 2015.
  8. Forex Education

    Four Currencies Under the Spotlight in 2016

    With currencies having become the “tail that wags the dog,” in terms of their impact on the global economy, these four currencies will be under the spotlight in 2016.
  9. Economics

    How And Why Oil Impacts The Canadian Dollar

    The value of the Canadian dollar, or the loonie, has a strong correlation with oil prices.
  10. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    The Top 3 ETFs For Investing in Canada

    Learn specific information about three of the most popular and best performing ETFs that offer exposure to Canadian equity markets for U.S. investors.
RELATED FAQS
  1. What's the difference between microeconomics and macroeconomics?

    Microeconomics is generally the study of individuals and business decisions, macroeconomics looks at higher up country and ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Is Canada a developed country?

    Canada is a developed country. Countries that are considered to have developed economies exhibit strength in typical economic ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Are Canadian Pension Plans inflation-protected?

    The Canada Pension Plan protects pension holdings against inflation and adjusts its annual rates for inflation. The Canada ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Are tax shelters legal in Canada?

    Most tax shelters are legal in Canada. However, there have been illegal tax shelter scams that the Canada Revenue Agency ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Does Canada have Social Security numbers?

    Social Insurance numbers (SINs) in Canada are equivalent to Social Security numbers (SSNs) in the United States. Canadian ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Who decides to print money in Canada?

    In Canada, new money comes from two places: the Bank of Canada (BOC) and chartered banks such as the Toronto Dominion Bank ... Read Full Answer >>
Hot Definitions
  1. Liquidation Margin

    Liquidation margin refers to the value of all of the equity positions in a margin account. If an investor or trader holds ...
  2. Black Swan

    An event or occurrence that deviates beyond what is normally expected of a situation and that would be extremely difficult ...
  3. Inverted Yield Curve

    An interest rate environment in which long-term debt instruments have a lower yield than short-term debt instruments of the ...
  4. Socially Responsible Investment - SRI

    An investment that is considered socially responsible because of the nature of the business the company conducts. Common ...
  5. Presidential Election Cycle (Theory)

    A theory developed by Yale Hirsch that states that U.S. stock markets are weakest in the year following the election of a ...
Trading Center