Canadian Depository For Securities Limited - CDS

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DEFINITION

Canada's national securities depository, clearing and settlement hub. The Canadian Depository for Securities Limited, widely known by its acronym CDS, provides reliable and cost-effective depository, clearing and settlement services to participants in Canada's equity, fixed income and money markets. It was incorporated in June 1970, in response to rising costs for back-office functions and increased trading volumes in the Canadian capital market. CDS holds over $3.5 trillion on deposit, and handles more than 360 million domestic and cross-border securities trades annually.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS

CDS's responsibilities include the safe custody and movement of securities, post-trade transactions processing, accurate record-keeping and the collection and distribution of securities entitlements such as dividends and interest payments. CDS is regulated by the securities commissions of Ontario and Quebec, and the Bank of Canada.


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