Canadian Derivatives Clearing Corporation - CDCC

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DEFINITION of 'Canadian Derivatives Clearing Corporation - CDCC'

The central clearing counterparty for exchange-traded derivative products, such as options and futures, in Canada. The Canadian Derivatives Clearing Corporation (CDCC) also acts as the clearinghouse for a growing range of over-the-counter financial instruments including fixed income and foreign exchange, and is the only integrated central clearing counterparty in North America that clears and settles options, futures and options on futures. CDCC is a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Montreal Exchange.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Canadian Derivatives Clearing Corporation - CDCC'

The organization was first referred to as Trans Canada Options (TCO), which was established in 1977 through the merger of the Montreal and Toronto options clearinghouses. Trans Canada Options changed its name to Canadian Derivatives Clearing Corporation in 1996. In 2000, CDCC became entirely owned by the Montreal Exchange. In 2008, the Montreal exchange and the TSX group merged to become the TMX group, the current owner and operator of the CDCC.

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