Cancelable Insurance

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DEFINITION of 'Cancelable Insurance'

This is insurance that may be canceled, at any time, by the insured party or by the insurance company. Aside from life insurance, most insurance policies can easily be. If the insurer cancels the policy, it must first give notice and must also refund prepaid premium on a pro rata basis.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Cancelable Insurance'

Before canceling an insurance policy, the insured party must make sure that he or she has replacement insurance coverage that is already confirmed. If there is no replacement coverage, the insured party can go completely uncovered for a period of time. One good reason for making certain of replacement coverage is that the insured party could face a situation in which certain medical conditions that developed during the prior health insurance coverage are excluded from coverage under the new insurance as "preexisting conditions." This is why it is essential to thoroughly research a new policy before the old one is canceled.

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