Capital Formation

What is 'Capital Formation '

Capital formation is a term used to describe net capital accumulation during an accounting period. Capital formation refers to net additions of capital stock such as equipment, buildings and other intermediate goods. A nation uses capital stock in combination with labour to provide services and produce goods; an increase in this capital stock is known as capital formation.

BREAKING DOWN 'Capital Formation '

Generally, the higher the capital formation of an economy, the faster an economy can grow its aggregate income. Increasing an economy's capital stock also increases its capacity for production, which means an economy can produce more. Producing more goods and services can lead to an increase in national income levels.

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RELATED FAQS
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    Discover the basic relationship between capital investment and economic growth, and why improving the capital structure increases ... Read Answer >>
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