Capital Investment

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DEFINITION of 'Capital Investment'

Funds invested in a firm or enterprise for the purposes of furthering its business objectives. Capital investment may also refer to a firm's acquisition of capital assets or fixed assets such as manufacturing plants and machinery that is expected to be productive over many years.


Sources of capital investment are manifold, and can include equity investors, banks, financial institutions, venture capital and angel investors. While capital investment is usually earmarked for capital or long-life assets, a portion may also be used for working capital purposes.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Capital Investment'

Capital investment encompasses a wide variety of funding options. While funding for capital investment is generally in the form of common or preferred equity issuance, it may also be through straight or convertible debt. It may range from an amount of less than $100,000 in seed financing for a start-up to amounts in the hundreds of millions for massive projects in capital-intensive sectors like mining, utilities and infrastructure.

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