Capital Purchase Program - CPP

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DEFINITION of 'Capital Purchase Program - CPP'

A program sponsored by the U.S. Treasury designed to provide new capital to banks, which will in turn allow them to loan more money to businesses and thus stimulate the economy. Under this program, the U.S. Treasury will purchase up to $250 billion of senior preferred shares of qualifying U.S. banks and savings institutions. Subscribing banks must be willing to sell an amount of stock equal to 1-3% of their risk-weighted assets.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Capital Purchase Program - CPP'

The Capital Purchase Program was offered to the financial community on October 14, 2008. In order to participate in the program, banks and savings institutions had to respond by November 14, 2008. The shares purchased by the Treasury are considered tier 1 capital. The shares will pay a dividend of 5% per year for the first five years and then reset to 9% per year thereafter.

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