Capital Recovery

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DEFINITION of 'Capital Recovery'

1. The earning back of the initial funds put into an investment. Capital recovery must occur before a company can earn a profit on its investment.

2. A euphemism for debt collection. Capital recovery companies obtain overdue payments from individuals and businesses that have not paid their bills. Upon obtaining payment and remitting it to the company to which it is owed, the capital recovery company earns a fee for its services.

3. A company's recouping of the money it has invested in machinery and equipment through asset disposition and liquidation.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Capital Recovery'

1. Initial cost, salvage value and projected revenues factor into a capital recovery analysis when a company is determining whether and at what cost to purchase an asset or invest in a new project.

2. A capital recovery company may specialize in collecting a particular type of debt, such as commercial debt, retail debt or healthcare debt.

3. If a company is going out of business and needs to liquidate its assets or has excess equipment that it needs to sell, it might hire a capital recovery company to appraise and auction off its assets. The company can use the cash from the auction to pay its creditors or to meet its ongoing capital requirements.

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