Capital Tax

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DEFINITION of 'Capital Tax'

A tax on a corporation's taxable capital, comprising capital stock, surpluses, indebtedness and reserves. Capital tax is applicable to capital owned by a company, not its spending. Capital taxes, in contrast to income taxes, are charged regardless of the profitability of the firm.
Also known as "corporation capital tax".

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Capital Tax'

In British Columbia, the corporation capital tax (CCT) is a tax levied on financial corporations with a permanent establishment in British Columbia and net paid-up capital in excess of a minimum threshold amount. For the purposes of the CCT, a financial corporation is a bank, trust company, credit union or loan corporation.


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