Capital Goods Sector

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DEFINITION of 'Capital Goods Sector'

A category of stocks related to the manufacture or distribution of goods. The sector is diverse, containing companies that manufacture machinery used to create capital goods, electrical equipment, aerospace and defense, engineering and construction projects.

Also referred to as the "industrials sector".

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Capital Goods Sector'

Performance in the capital goods sector is sensitive to fluctuations in the business cycle. Because it relies heavily on manufacturing, the sector does well when the economy is booming or expanding. As economic conditions worsen, the demand for capital goods drops off, usually lowering the prices of stocks in the sector.

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