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What is 'Capital Expenditure (CAPEX)'

Capital expenditure, or CapEx, are funds used by a company to acquire or upgrade physical assets such as property, industrial buildings or equipment. It is often used to undertake new projects or investments by the firm. This type of outlay is also made by companies to maintain or increase the scope of their operations. These expenditures can include everything from repairing a roof to building, to purchasing a piece of equipment, or building a brand new factory.

BREAKING DOWN 'Capital Expenditure (CAPEX)'

In terms of accounting, an expense is considered to be a capital expenditure when the asset is a newly purchased capital asset or an investment that improves the useful life of an existing capital asset. If an expense is a capital expenditure, it needs to be capitalized. This requires the company to spread the cost of the expenditure (the fixed cost) over the useful life of the asset. If, however, the expense is one that maintains the asset at its current condition, the cost is deducted fully in the year of the expense.

The amount of capital expenditures a company is likely to have depends on the industry it occupies. Some of the most capital intensive industries have the highest levels of capital expenditures including oil exploration and production, telecom, manufacturing and utilities.

Capital expenditure should not be confused with revenue expenditure or operating expenses (OPEX). Revenue expenses are shorter-term expenses required to meet the ongoing operational costs of running a business, and therefore they are essentially identical to operating expenses. Unlike capital expenditures, revenue expenses can be fully tax-deducted in the same year in which the expenses occur.

Using Capital Expenditures in Multiples for Relative Valuation

The cash flow to capital expenditure ratio, or CF/CapEX, relates to a company's ability to acquire long term assets using free cash flow. The cash flow to capital expenditures ratio will often fluctuate as businesses go through cycles of large and small capital expenditures. A high multiple is indicative of relative financial strength. If a company has the financial ability to invest in itself through capital expenditure, it is easier for the company to grow. It is important to note that this is an industry specific ratio, and should only be compared to a ratio derived from another company that has similar CapEx requirements.

CF to CapEx is calculated as:

CF/CapEx = Cash Flow From Operations / Capital Expenditures

Capital expenditure can also be used in calculating free cash flow to equity (FCFE) to a firm with the following formula: 

FCFE = Earnings Per Share – (CapEx – Depreciation)(1 – Debt Ratio) -  (Change in Net Working Capital)(1 – Debt Ratio)

or alternatively: 

FCFE = Net Income - Net CapEx - Change in Net Working Capital + New Debt - Debt Repayment

The greater the capital expenditure for a firm, the lower the free cash flow to equity.

 

 

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