Capital Gearing

What is 'Capital Gearing'

Capital gearing is the degree to which a company acquires assets or to which it funds its ongoing operations with long- or short-term debt. Capital gearing will differ between companies and industries, and will often change over time.

Capital gearing is also known as "financial leverage".

BREAKING DOWN 'Capital Gearing'

In the event of a leveraged buyout, the amount of capital gearing a company will employ will dramatically increase as the company increases its debt in order to finance the acquisition. When analyzing a firm undergoing a leveraged buyout, it is important to consider the firm's ability to service the additional interest payments on an after-tax basis, as well as the likelihood of the firm paying off the new debt as it matures.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Gearing

    The level of a company’s debt related to its equity capital, ...
  2. Gearing Ratio

    A general term describing a financial ratio that compares some ...
  3. Leverage

    1. The use of various financial instruments or borrowed capital, ...
  4. Leverage Ratio

    Any ratio used to calculate the financial leverage of a company ...
  5. Bust-Up Takeover

    A corporate buyout in which the acquirer sells off a piece of ...
  6. Long-Term Debt To Capitalization ...

    A ratio showing the financial leverage of a firm, calculated ...
Related Articles
  1. Markets

    What is Gearing?

    Gearing, also called leverage, is the degree to which a company’s operations are funded by lenders versus shareholders.
  2. Investing

    What Is A Good Gearing Ratio?

    Gearing ratios are useful for evaluating a company’s financial fitness through the figures found on its profit and loss statement.
  3. Investing

    What is the Gearing Ratio?

    Gearing ratios are financial ratios that measure a company’s leverage.
  4. Investing

    How to Use the Gearing Ratio

    The gearing ratio is a figure that compares a company’s owners’ equity to the amount of money the company has borrowed.
  5. Investing

    The Optimal Use Of Financial Leverage In A Corporate Capital Structure

    The amount of debt and equity that makes up a company's capital structure has many risk and return implications.
  6. Markets

    Target Corp: WACC Analysis (TGT)

    Learn about the importance of capital structure when making investment decisions, and how Target's capital structure compares against the rest of the industry.
  7. Investing

    Financial Leverage In Corporate Capital Structure

    Corporate management uses financial leverage to increase earnings per share and return-on-equity.
  8. Investing

    Explaining Leveraged Loans

    Leveraged loans are loans extended to companies or people who already have large amounts of debt.
  9. Investing

    Evaluating A Company's Capital Structure

    Learn to use the composition of debt and equity to evaluate balance sheet strength.
  10. ETFs & Mutual Funds

    Reinvesting Capital Gains In Leveraged Portfolios

    Don't get forced into action. Learn how to plan properly to avoid making rash decisions.
RELATED FAQS
  1. What is the difference between a capital gearing ratio and a net gearing ratio?

    Understand the definition of gearing in the finance industry, the difference between net gearing and capital gearing ratios ... Read Answer >>
  2. What is considered to be a bad gearing ratio?

    Understand the basics of gearing, including the net gearing ratio, what constitutes a bad gearing ratio and how this figure ... Read Answer >>
  3. What is the difference between the gearing ratio and the debt-to-equity ratio?

    Dive deeper into gearing ratios: what are they, how are they used and why the debt to equity ratio is one of the most popular ... Read Answer >>
  4. What does the gearing ratio say about risk?

    Find out why lenders and investors pay close attention to a firm's gearing ratios, and why both too much and too little borrowing ... Read Answer >>
  5. What is a good gearing ratio?

    Understand the meaning of the gearing ratio, how it is calculated, the definition of high and low gearing, and how they reflect ... Read Answer >>
  6. How is a leveraged buyout different from a buyout?

    Learn about leveraged buyouts and circumstances under which an acquiring company wishes to pursue a buyout funded mostly ... Read Answer >>
Hot Definitions
  1. GBP

    The abbreviation for the British pound sterling, the official currency of the United Kingdom, the British Overseas Territories ...
  2. Diversification

    A risk management technique that mixes a wide variety of investments within a portfolio. The rationale behind this technique ...
  3. European Union - EU

    A group of European countries that participates in the world economy as one economic unit and operates under one official ...
  4. Sell-Off

    The rapid selling of securities, such as stocks, bonds and commodities. The increase in supply leads to a decline in the ...
  5. Brazil, Russia, India And China - BRIC

    An acronym for the economies of Brazil, Russia, India and China combined. It has been speculated that by 2050 these four ...
  6. Brexit

    The Brexit, an abbreviation of "British exit" that mirrors the term Grexit, refers to the possibility of Britain's withdrawal ...
Trading Center