Capitalization

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Capitalization'

1. In accounting, it is where costs to acquire an asset are included in the price of the asset.

2. The sum of a corporation's stock, long-term debt and retained earnings. Also known as "invested capital".

3. A company's outstanding shares multiplied by its share price, better known as "market capitalization".

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Capitalization'

1. For example, if a machine has a price of $1 million this value would be recorded in the assets, if there was also a $20,000 charge for shipping the machine then this cost would be capitalized and included in assets.

2. The capitalization of a firm can be overcapitalized and undercapitalized, both of which are potential negatives.

3. If a company has 1,000,000 shares and is currently trading at $10 a share, their market capitalization is $10,000,000.

VIDEO

Loading the player...
RELATED TERMS
  1. Outstanding Shares

    A company's stock currently held by all its shareholders, including ...
  2. Capitalization Of Profits

    Converting a company's retained earnings, which represent the ...
  3. Reconstitution

    A reevaluation of a market index that involves adding and removing ...
  4. Commodity Credit Corporation - ...

    An agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The Commodity ...
  5. Long-Term Debt

    Loans and financial obligations lasting over one year. Long-term ...
  6. Market Capitalization

    The total dollar market value of all of a company's outstanding ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. How does the use of International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) affect key ...

    While much has been achieved since 2002 in convergence between international financial reporting standards (IFRS) and U.S. ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is the best managed fund for trading mid-cap stocks?

    Mid-cap stocks have a moderate capitalization and are officially valued between $1 billion and $8 billion. Actively managed ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What are some examples of general and administrative expenses?

    In accounting, general and administrative expenses represent the necessary costs to maintain a company's daily operations ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How do dividend distributions affect additional paid in capital?

    Whether a dividend distribution has any effect on additional paid-in capital depends solely on what type of dividend is issued: ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. Why can additional paid in capital never have a negative balance?

    The additional paid-in capital figure on a company's balance sheet can never be negative because companies do not pay investors ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. When does the fixed charge coverage ratio suggest that a company should stop borrowing ...

    Since the fixed charge coverage ratio indicates the number of times a company is capable of making its fixed charge payments ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Investing

    What's Capitalization?

    Capitalization has different meanings depending on the context.
  2. Insurance

    Market Capitalization Defined

    Find out the differences between mega-, large-, mid- and small-cap stocks and how each suits different investing styles.
  3. Trading Strategies

    Small Caps Boast Big Advantages

    Find out why little companies have the greatest potential for growth.
  4. Options & Futures

    Find Quality Investments With ROIC

    Return on invested capital is a great way to measure the true value produced by a company. Learn to use the ROIC metric and increase your chances of finding successful investments.
  5. Economics

    Understanding the Top Line

    Top line refers to a company’s gross sales without any reductions for discounts or returns.
  6. Economics

    What's an Allowance for Doubtful Accounts?

    The allowance for doubtful accounts represents the percentage of the accounts receivable the company expects to write-off as uncollectible.
  7. Fundamental Analysis

    Understanding Activity Ratios

    Activity ratios measure how effectively a business uses its assets.
  8. Investing Basics

    What is Accrued Income?

    In a mutual fund, accrued income is earnings that have accumulated over the year, but have not yet been paid out to shareholders.
  9. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    Top 3 ETFs For Investing in China

    Discover the top three China ETFs. Chinese stocks tend to be quite volatile, presenting opportunities for savvy investors, given the country's high growth rate.
  10. Fundamental Analysis

    Explaining the Common Size Income Statement

    A common size income statement expresses each account as a percentage of net sales.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Bogey

    A buzzword that refers to a benchmark used to evaluate a fund's performance. The benchmark is an index that reflects the ...
  2. Xetra

    An all-electronic trading system based in Frankfurt, Germany. Launched in 1997 and operated by the Deutsche Börse, the Xetra ...
  3. Nuncupative Will

    A verbal will that must have two witnesses and can only deal with the distribution of personal property. A nuncupative will ...
  4. OsMA

    An abbreviation for Oscillator - Moving Average. OsMA is used in technical analysis to represent the variance between an ...
  5. Investopedia

    One of the best-known sources of financial information on the internet. Investopedia is a resource for investors, consumers ...
  6. Unfair Claims Practice

    The improper avoidance of a claim by an insurer or an attempt to reduce the size of the claim. By engaging in unfair claims ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!