Capital Reduction

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DEFINITION of 'Capital Reduction'

The process of decreasing a company's shareholder equity through share cancellations and share repurchases. The reduction of capital is done by companies for numerous reasons including increasing shareholder value and producing a more efficient capital structure.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Capital Reduction'

After a capital reduction, the number of shares in the company will decrease by the reduction amount. In some capital reductions, shareholders will receive a cash payment for shares cancelled - but, in other situations, there is minimal impact on shareholders.

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