Capital Stock

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DEFINITION of 'Capital Stock'

The common and preferred stock a company is authorized to issue, according to their corporate charter. Capital stock represents the size of the equity position of a firm and can be found on the balance sheet (or notes) of a typical financial statement. Firms can both issue more capital stock, or buyback shares that are currently owned by shareholders.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Capital Stock'

In financial statement analysis, an increasing capital stock account tends to be a sign of economic health, since the company can use the additional proceeds to invest in projects or machinery that will increase corporate profits and/or efficiency. On the other hand, however, firms that continually issue secondary issues of capital stock may be doing so to raise funds, due to poor company performance.

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RELATED FAQS
  1. Why is an increase in capital stock on a company's balance sheet a bad sign for stockholders?

    An increase in the total of capital stock showing on a company's balance sheet is bad for investors, because it represents ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. How do companies report the value of their capital stock?

    A company's capital stock shows up in the shareholders' equity portion of the balance sheet. There are two general methods ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What's the difference between a capital stock and a treasury stock?

    Capital stock and treasury stock describe two different types of a company's shares. Capital stock is the total amount of ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What is the difference between called-up share capital and paid-up share capital?

    The difference between called-up share capital and paid-up share capital is investors have already paid in full for paid-up ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How do dividend distributions affect additional paid in capital?

    Whether a dividend distribution has any effect on additional paid-in capital depends solely on what type of dividend is issued: ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Why can additional paid in capital never have a negative balance?

    The additional paid-in capital figure on a company's balance sheet can never be negative because companies do not pay investors ... Read Full Answer >>
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