Capital Surplus

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DEFINITION of 'Capital Surplus'

Equity which cannot otherwise be classified as capital stock or retained earnings. It's usually created from a stock issued at a premium over par value.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Capital Surplus'

Capital surplus is also known as share premium (UK), acquired surplus, donated surplus, paid-in surplus, or additional paid-in capital.

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