Carbon Trade


DEFINITION of 'Carbon Trade'

An exchange of credits between nations designed to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide. The carbon trade allows countries that have higher carbon emissions to purchase the right to release more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere from countries that have lower carbon emissions. The carbon trade originated with the 1997 Kyoto Protocol and is intended to reduce overall carbon dioxide emissions to 5% below 1990 levels between 2008 and 2012.

BREAKING DOWN 'Carbon Trade'

The carbon trade also refers to the ability of individual companies to trade polluting rights through a regulatory system known as cap and trade. Companies that pollute less can sell their unused pollution rights to companies that pollute more. The goal is to ensure that companies in the aggregate do not exceed a baseline level of pollution and to provide a financial incentive for companies to pollute less.

  1. Carbon Disclosure Rating

    A numerical score that indicates the level of reporting of a ...
  2. Cap And Trade

    A regulatory system that is meant to reduce certain kinds of ...
  3. Emissions Reduction Purchase Agreement ...

    A transaction that transfers carbon credits between two parties ...
  4. Rights

    A security giving stockholders entitlement to purchase new shares ...
  5. Carbon Credit

    A permit that allows the holder to emit one ton of carbon dioxide. ...
  6. Kyoto Protocol

    An international agreement that aims to reduce carbon dioxide ...
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  1. What is the carbon trade?

    The carbon trade came about in response to the Kyoto Protocol. Signed in Kyoto, Japan, by some 180 countries in December ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. When do I need a letter of credit?

    A letter of credit, sometimes referred to as a documentary credit, acts as a promissory note from a financial institution, ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. When has the United States run its largest trade deficits?

    In macroeconomics, balance of trade is one of the leading economic metrics that determines the trading relationship of a ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Which is more important to a nation's economy, the balance of trade or the balance ...

    There is no question the composition of a country's balance of payments is more important than its balance of trade. This ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What is the difference between cost and freight (CFR) and cost, insurance and freight ...

    The difference between cost and freight (CFR) and cost, insurance and freight (CIF) is essentially the requirement under ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What is the difference between Cost and Freight (CFR) and Free on Board (FOB)?

    The difference between cost and freight (CFR) and free on board (FOB) lies in who has responsibility for various shipping ... Read Full Answer >>

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