Career-Ending Move

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DEFINITION of 'Career-Ending Move'

A huge mistake or bad decision made by an employee that has big consequences. A career-ending move is a mistake so egregious that it would likely result in the loss of the employee's job and possibly end their career.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Career-Ending Move'

There are many different mistakes or errors that could be counted as career-ending moves. For example, an accountant that knowingly falsifies accounting numbers, if caught, will lose his/her job and likely end his/her career.

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