Cash Disbursement Journal


DEFINITION of 'Cash Disbursement Journal'

A record kept by accountants to record all financial expenditures made by a company. Cash disbursement journals serve a number of functions, such as a source for recording tax write-offs and the categorization of other expenses. This journal essentially functions as a checkbook ledger, for all practical purposes.

BREAKING DOWN 'Cash Disbursement Journal'

Cash disbursement journals may record varying types of expenses by assigning each type of expense a code, or by recording the various expenses in different columns. These journals are used to create annual balance sheets and other financial statements.

  1. Disbursement

    The act of paying out or disbursing money. Disbursements can ...
  2. Remote Disbursement

    A cash-management technique that some businesses use to increase ...
  3. Controlled Disbursement

    A technique commonly employed in corporate cash management. Controlled ...
  4. Delayed Disbursement

    A cash management technique that involves a company paying vendors ...
  5. Cash Concentration And Disbursement ...

    A type of electronic payment used to transfer funds between remote ...
  6. Accountant

    A professional who performs accounting functions such as audits ...
Related Articles
  1. Investing Basics

    12 Things You Need To Know About Financial Statements

    Discover how to keep score of companies to increase your chances of choosing a winner.
  2. Fundamental Analysis

    Analyzing A Bank's Financial Statements

    A careful review of a bank's financial statements can help you identify key factors in a potential investment.
  3. Bonds & Fixed Income

    Evaluating A Company's Capital Structure

    Learn to use the composition of debt and equity to evaluate balance sheet strength.
  4. Investing Basics

    The Importance Of Corporate Transparency

    Clear and honest financial statements not only reflect value, they also help ensure it.
  5. Active Trading Fundamentals

    Evaluating A Company's Management

    Financial statements don't tell you everything about a company's health. Investigate the management behind the numbers!
  6. Markets

    Cash Flow On Steroids: Why Companies Cheat

    Pressure to be the best can sometimes push corporations to cheat. Learn how they do it and how to spot it.
  7. Options & Futures

    An Investor's Checklist To Financial Footnotes

    Footnotes to the financial statements contain very important information, but reading them takes skill.
  8. Active Trading

    An Introduction To Depreciation

    Companies make choices and assumptions in calculating depreciation, and you need to know how these affect the bottom line.
  9. Markets

    Operating Cash Flow: Better Than Net Income?

    Differences between accrual accounting and cash flows show why net income is easier to manipulate.
  10. Investing Basics

    How To Efficiently Read An Annual Report

    Annual reports are clearly prepared without any intent to deceive or mislead investors. Still, investors should read them with a dose of skepticism.
  1. What is the difference between drawdown and disbursement?

    In finance, both drawdown and disbursement have multiple meanings. They are similar in that they both refer to a transfer ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Can working capital be depreciated?

    Working capital as current assets cannot be depreciated the way long-term, fixed assets are. In accounting, depreciation ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. Do working capital funds expire?

    While working capital funds do not expire, the working capital figure does change over time. This is because it is calculated ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How much working capital does a small business need?

    The amount of working capital a small business needs to run smoothly depends largely on the type of business, its operating ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What does high working capital say about a company's financial prospects?

    If a company has high working capital, it has more than enough liquid funds to meet its short-term obligations. Working capital, ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. How can working capital affect a company's finances?

    Working capital, or total current assets minus total current liabilities, can affect a company's longer-term investment effectiveness ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Quick Ratio

    The quick ratio is an indicator of a company’s short-term liquidity. The quick ratio measures a company’s ability to meet ...
  2. Black Tuesday

    October 29, 1929, when the DJIA fell 12% - one of the largest one-day drops in stock market history. More than 16 million ...
  3. Black Monday

    October 19, 1987, when the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) lost almost 22% in a single day. That event marked the beginning ...
  4. Monetary Policy

    Monetary policy is the actions of a central bank, currency board or other regulatory committee that determine the size and ...
  5. Indemnity

    Indemnity is compensation for damages or loss. Indemnity in the legal sense may also refer to an exemption from liability ...
  6. Discount Bond

    A bond that is issued for less than its par (or face) value, or a bond currently trading for less than its par value in the ...
Trading Center