Cash Discount

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DEFINITION of 'Cash Discount'

An incentive that a seller offers to a buyer in return for paying a bill owed before the scheduled due date. The seller will usually reduce the amount owed by the buyer by a small percentage or a set dollar amount. If used properly, cash discounts improve the days-sales-outstanding aspect of a business's cash conversion cycle.

BREAKING DOWN 'Cash Discount'

For example, a typical cash discount would be if the seller offered a 2% discount on an invoice due in 30 days if the buyer were to pay within the first 10 days of receiving the invoice.

Providing a small cash discount would be beneficial for the seller as it would allow him to have access to the cash sooner. The sooner a seller receives the cash, the earlier he can put the money back into the business to buy more supplies and/or grow the company further.

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