Cash For Caulkers

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DEFINITION of 'Cash For Caulkers'

The colloquial name for the United States' Home Star Energy Retrofit Act of 2010, which provides incentives for specific energy-efficient home improvements. The bill allocates $6 billion to be used as rebates under two programs: the Silver Star program and the Gold Star program. The Silver Star program allows rebates of up to $3,000 for energy-efficient doors, windows, insulation and appliances. The Gold Star program provides rebates of up to $8,000 for energy audits and improvements that reduce total energy usage by more than 20%.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Cash For Caulkers'

The bill aims to provide economic stimulus to home contractors that have been hard hit by the downturn in the real estate industry. The bill is controversial among Republicans, who worry that it will increase the federal deficit. To address these concerns, language was inserted in the bill that provides that it will not be implemented unless the programs can be funded without increasing the federal spending deficit.



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