Cash Or Deferred Arrangement - CODA

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DEFINITION of 'Cash Or Deferred Arrangement - CODA'

The method of funding any type of qualified profit-sharing or stock bonus plan. Cash or deferred arrangements allow employees to contribute a portion of their salaries to the plan so that their savings can grow tax-deferred. The most common type of CODA is a cash bonus which is paid into their 401(k) plan, but it could also be a salary reduction.

BREAKING DOWN 'Cash Or Deferred Arrangement - CODA'

Employees who participate in cash or deferred arrangements may still contribute to traditional or Roth IRAs as well. However, they may not receive the full deduction from a traditional IRA contribution if their incomes are above a certain level. CODA plans allow the individual to fund their retirement and avoid immediate taxation on the diverted contributions.

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