Cash

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DEFINITION of 'Cash'

Legal tender or coins that can be used in exchange goods, debt, or services. Sometimes also including the value of assets that can be converted into cash immediately, as reported by a company.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Cash'

This usually includes bank accounts and marketable securities, such as government bonds and banker's acceptances.

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  5. Cash Flow

    1. A revenue or expense stream that changes a cash account over ...
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