Cash Account

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DEFINITION of 'Cash Account'

A regular brokerage account in which the customer is required by Regulation T to pay for securities within two days of when a purchase is made.

BREAKING DOWN 'Cash Account'

This is the basic, plain vanilla account where you deposit cash to buy stocks, bonds, mutual funds, etc.

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