Cash And Cash Equivalents - CCE

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What are 'Cash And Cash Equivalents - CCE'

Cash and cash equivalents (CCE) refer to the item on the balance sheet that reports the value of a company's assets that are cash or can be converted into cash immediately.

BREAKING DOWN 'Cash And Cash Equivalents - CCE'

Examples of cash and cash equivalents are bank accounts, marketable securities and Treasury bills.

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