Cash Flow From Investing Activities

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DEFINITION of 'Cash Flow From Investing Activities'

An item on the cash flow statement that reports the aggregate change in a company's cash position resulting from any gains (or losses) from investments in the financial markets and operating subsidiaries, and changes resulting from amounts spent on investments in capital assets such as plant and equipment.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Cash Flow From Investing Activities'

When analyzing a company's cash flow statement, it is important to consider each of the various sections which contribute to the overall change in cash position. In many cases, a firm may have negative overall cash flow for a given quarter, but if the company can generate positive cash flow from its business operations, the negative overall cash flow may be a result of heavy investment expenditures, which is not necessarily a bad thing.

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