Cash-On-Cash Return

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DEFINITION of 'Cash-On-Cash Return'

A rate of return often used in real estate transactions. The calculation determines the cash income on the cash invested. Calculated as:

Cash-On-Cash Return

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Cash-On-Cash Return'

For example when you purchase a rental property, you might put down only 10% for a cash down payment. Cash-on-cash return would measure the annual return you made on the property in relation to the down payment.

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