Cash Trigger

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Cash Trigger'

A condition that triggers an investor to make a trade or take a specific action, such as a purchase, sale of the security, or the purchase or sale of a derivative (such as an option) of that security.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Cash Trigger'

If XYZ stock rises from $20 to $40 a share, an investor could sell the stock outright, or sell calls against the stock in an effort to garner income. Again, the cash price is ultimately the trigger or determinant that stimulates some future action.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Rate Trigger

    A sizeable decline in interest rates that may trigger or cause ...
  2. Cash Advance

    A service provided by many credit card issuers allowing cardholders ...
  3. Stock

    A type of security that signifies ownership in a corporation ...
  4. Security

    A financial instrument that represents: an ownership position ...
  5. Derivative

    A security whose price is dependent upon or derived from one ...
  6. Trade

    A basic economic concept that involves multiple parties participating ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. How does a forward contract differ from a call option?

    Forward contracts and call options are different financial instruments that allow two parties to purchase or sell assets ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What are the main risks associated with trading derivatives?

    The primary risks associated with trading derivatives are market, counterparty, liquidity and interconnection risks. Derivatives ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. How can an investor profit from a fall in the utilities sector?

    The utilities sector exhibits a high degree of stability compared to the broader market. This makes it best-suited for buy-and-hold ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What is the difference between derivatives and options?

    Options are one category of derivatives. Other types of derivatives include futures contracts, swaps and forward contracts. ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How are rights distributed in a rights offering?

    In a rights offering, rights are distributed to shareholders based on the number of shares they already own. What Is a Rights ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What risks should I consider taking a short put position?

    The risks to consider before taking a short put position are the odds of sustained weakness in the asset price and a spike ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Active Trading Fundamentals

    Support And Resistance Basics

    Understanding the concept of Support and Resistance in trading can drastically improve your short-term investing strategy.
  2. Active Trading Fundamentals

    The Utility Of Trendlines

    Trendlines give an investor a good idea of the direction an investment might move in. Discover how to make them work for your portfolio.
  3. Investing Basics

    Explaining Absolute Return

    Absolute return refers to an asset’s total return over a set period of time. It’s usually applied to stocks, mutual funds or hedge funds.
  4. Investing Basics

    How To Create Capital Protected Investment Using Options?

    Does "Capital-Protection" guarantee in an investment product sound attractive? Wait! Here's how you can create a better one for yourself, at low-cost!
  5. Options & Futures

    How to Make Money by Trading Index Options

    Index options are less volatile and more liquid than regular options. Understand how to trade index options with this simple introduction.
  6. Investing

    4 Structured Product Types Wealthy Clients Love

    High-net-worth investors find structured products appealing for a variety of reasons. Here's a look at four types.
  7. Mutual Funds & ETFs

    5 Disadvantages of Mutual Funds Compared to ETFs

    In the mutual funds vs. exchange-traded funds debate, ETFs have some clear advantages.
  8. Options & Futures

    Understanding Bull Spread Option Strategies

    Bull spread option strategies, such as a bull call spread strategy, are hedging strategies for traders to take a bullish view while reducing risk.
  9. Investing Basics

    Explaining Gamma

    Gamma is a measurement of how fast the delta of an option’s price changes after a 1-point movement in the underlying security.
  10. Economics

    Will the Selloff in China Hurt the Global Economy?

    Though China is the world’s second largest economy, its volatility in the stock market is unlikely to have an impact on the global or Chinese economy.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Dog And Pony Show

    A colloquial term that generally refers to a presentation or seminar to market new products or services to potential buyers.
  2. Topless Meeting

    A meeting in which participants are not allowed to use laptops. A topless meeting organizer can also ban the use of smartphones, ...
  3. Hedging Transaction

    A type of transaction that limits investment risk with the use of derivatives, such as options and futures contracts. Hedging ...
  4. Bogey

    A buzzword that refers to a benchmark used to evaluate a fund's performance. The benchmark is an index that reflects the ...
  5. Xetra

    An all-electronic trading system based in Frankfurt, Germany. Launched in 1997 and operated by the Deutsche Börse, the Xetra ...
  6. Nuncupative Will

    A verbal will that must have two witnesses and can only deal with the distribution of personal property. A nuncupative will ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!