Catastrophe Futures

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Catastrophe Futures'

Catastrophe futures are futures contracts traded on the Chicago Board of Trade (CBOT). These futures contracts are used by insurance companies to protect themselves against future catastrophe losses. The value of a catastophe futures contract is equal to $25,000 multiplied by the catastrophe ratio for the quarter. The catastrophe ratio is a numerical value proided by the CBOT every quarter.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Catastrophe Futures'

Catastrophe futures started trading on the Chicago Board of Trading (CBOT) in 1992. The value of a catastrophe future contracts increase when catastrophe losses are high and decrease when catastrophe losses are low. In the event of a catastrophe, if losses are high, the value of the contract goes up and the insurer makes a gain that hopefully offsets whatever losses that might be incurred. The reverse is also true. If catastrophe losses are lower than expected, the value of the contract decreases and the insurer (buyer) loses money.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Howard-D'Antonio Strategy

    An algorithm designed to maximize the expected return of a portfolio. ...
  2. Catastrophe Loss Index - CLI

    An index used in the insurance industry to quantify the magnitude ...
  3. Dojima Rice Exchange

    The world's first commodity futures exchange. Established in ...
  4. Hollywood Stock Exchange - HSX

    An online prediction market where "investors" bet on the performance ...
  5. Cantor Futures Exchange

    An electronic, online marketplace where investors can buy and ...
  6. Hedge

    Making an investment to reduce the risk of adverse price movements ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. How do futures contracts roll over?

    Traders roll over futures contracts to switch from the front month contract that is close to expiration to another contract ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. Why do companies enter into futures contracts?

    Different types of companies may enter into futures contracts for different purposes. The most common reason is to hedge ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What does a futures contract cost?

    The value of a futures contract is derived from the cash value of the underlying asset. While a futures contract may have ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. What happens if my insurance claim falls below the deductible level?

    Though the ins and outs of health insurance are often confusing, the concept of the insurance deductible is relatively straightforward. ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. How is the deductible I paid for my insurance claim treated for tax purposes?

    The deductible you pay on your health insurance policy may be tax-deductible if you meet certain conditions. However, whether ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What are the main factors that impact share prices in the insurance sector?

    The main factors that impact share prices in the insurance sector are interest rates, earnings and actuarial risk. In the ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Options & Futures

    Are Derivatives Safe For Retail Investors?

    These vehicles have gotten a bad rap in the press. Find out whether they deserve it.
  2. Options & Futures

    Interpreting Volume For The Futures Market

    Learn how to read the volume reports, look at the relation to liquidity and interpret volume using open interest.
  3. Active Trading

    How Companies Use Derivatives To Hedge Risk

    Derivatives can reduce the risks associated with changes in foreign exchange rates, interest rates and commodity prices.
  4. Options & Futures

    Options On Futures: A World Of Potential Profit

    There's one simple hurdle in the transition from stock to futures options: learning about product specifications.
  5. Investing Basics

    Understanding Total Return Swaps

    A total return swap is a contract in which a payer and receiver exchange the credit risk and market risk of an underlying asset.
  6. Insurance

    How Does Cash-Value Life Insurance Work?

    Cash-value life insurance pays a beneficiary upon the death of the policyholder, and accumulates a cash value during the policyholder’s lifetime.
  7. Investing Basics

    Explaining Absolute Return

    Absolute return refers to an asset’s total return over a set period of time. It’s usually applied to stocks, mutual funds or hedge funds.
  8. Economics

    Why The Dollar’s Strength Can Continue

    Overall, the U.S. dollar has rallied this year, with the Dollar Index (DXY) now up by roughly 8 percent year-to-date, but the gain hasn’t been steady.
  9. Budgeting

    How to Defray Long-Term Care Expenses

    Here's a handful of options on what you can do to defray long-term care expenses.
  10. Investing Basics

    Top 3 Ways to Manage Lump-Sum Windfalls

    Have you just had a load of money drop into your lap? If so, several enviable options are available to you. Which one is the best choice?

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Bogey

    A buzzword that refers to a benchmark used to evaluate a fund's performance. The benchmark is an index that reflects the ...
  2. Xetra

    An all-electronic trading system based in Frankfurt, Germany. Launched in 1997 and operated by the Deutsche Börse, the Xetra ...
  3. Nuncupative Will

    A verbal will that must have two witnesses and can only deal with the distribution of personal property. A nuncupative will ...
  4. OsMA

    An abbreviation for Oscillator - Moving Average. OsMA is used in technical analysis to represent the variance between an ...
  5. Investopedia

    One of the best-known sources of financial information on the internet. Investopedia is a resource for investors, consumers ...
  6. Unfair Claims Practice

    The improper avoidance of a claim by an insurer or an attempt to reduce the size of the claim. By engaging in unfair claims ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!