Catch Up Effect


DEFINITION of 'Catch Up Effect'

A theory speculating that, since poorer economies tend to grow more rapidly than wealthier economies, all economies in time will converge in terms of per capita income. In other words, the poorer economies will literally "catch-up" to the more robust economies.

The catch-up effect is also referred to as the theory of convergence.

BREAKING DOWN 'Catch Up Effect'

Because developing markets have access to the technological know-how of the advanced nations, they often experienced rapid rates of growth. However, although developing countries can see faster economic growth than more economically advanced countries, the limitations posed a lack of capital can greatly reduce a developing country's ability to catch-up.

Historically, some developing countries have been very successful in managing resources and securing capital to efficiently increase economic productivity; however, this has not become the norm on a global scale.

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    A nation's economy that is progressing toward becoming advanced, ...
  5. Macroeconomics

    The field of economics that studies the behavior of the aggregate ...
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    A situation in which a single company or group owns all or nearly ...
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