Caveat Emptor

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DEFINITION of 'Caveat Emptor'

A Latin phrase for "let the buyer beware." The term is primarily used in real property transactions. Essentially it proclaims that the buyer must perform their due diligence when purchasing an item or service.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Caveat Emptor'

In other words, consumers need to know their rights and be vigilant in avoiding scams. For example in the private purchase of a used car, caveat emptor places an onus on the buyer to make sure the car is worth the purchase price. This is because once the transaction is complete the buyer will not receive a warranty or return option from the seller.

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