Chartered Business Valuator - CBV

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DEFINITION of 'Chartered Business Valuator - CBV'

A designation offered by the Canadian Institute of Chartered Business Valuators (CICBV). A Chartered Business Valuator (CBV) is a financial professional who determines the value of all, or part of a business or company. CBVs take into account many factors and methods when determining the value of a business, including economic conditions, tangible and intangible assets and future cash flow.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Chartered Business Valuator - CBV'

To become a Chartered Business Valuator in Canada, a candidate must first complete four core courses which include business and securities valuation as well as law and tax, along with two elective courses. A CBV candidate must also accumulate 1,500 hours of business and securities valuation work experience as well as receive a passing grade on the membership entrance exam.

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