Capital Cost Allowance - CCA

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DEFINITION of 'Capital Cost Allowance - CCA'

A yearly deduction or depreciation that can be claimed for income tax purposes on the cost of certain assets. The term capital cost allowance relates (CCA) mainly to taxation in Canada. CCA can be claimed on the assets of a business that are expected to last for several years, such as buildings, plant and equipment, or machinery, as well as on additions and improvements to such assets. CCA is generally calculated based on the declining balance method.

BREAKING DOWN 'Capital Cost Allowance - CCA'

The Canada Revenue Agency sets down the rates at which CCA can be claimed for various classes of assets. The CCA rate for assets that are subject to rapid obsolescence such as computers, software and motor vehicles is much higher than the CCA rate for longer-life assets like buildings. Note that a business does not have to claim the maximum allowable amount of CCA in a given year, but can claim any amount from zero to the maximum.

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