Canadian Capital Markets Association - CCMA

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DEFINITION of 'Canadian Capital Markets Association - CCMA'

A nonprofit organization that was created to analyze issues arising in the Canadian and international capital markets. The organization is focused on being an active participant toward developing and implementing government legislation and regulatory policies relating to industry practices in the capital markets.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Canadian Capital Markets Association - CCMA'

The CCMA was created in the year 2000. The association is primarily comprised of industry experts who work for many of the large capital market institutions in Canada. The association is comprised of six committees that focus on a specific area of the capital markets. These committees consist of the Board of Directors and Observers, Buy-Side Subcommittee, Custodian/Broker Subcommittee, Legal/Regulatory Working Group, Communications and Education Working Group and the Trade Tracking Analysis Subcommittee.

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