Current Cost of Supplies - CCS

AAA

DEFINITION of 'Current Cost of Supplies - CCS'

This refers to the net income of a company after taking into account the increase (or decrease) in expenses over the reporting period. It is typically used by commodity reliant businesses.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Current Cost of Supplies - CCS'

You will quite often find this term used in the energy industry because the price of oil can change so much from one year to the next.

RELATED TERMS
  1. Commodity

    1. A basic good used in commerce that is interchangeable with ...
  2. Net Income - NI

    1. A company's total earnings (or profit). Net income is calculated ...
  3. Cost Of Goods Sold - COGS

    The direct costs attributable to the production of the goods ...
  4. Chart Of Accounts

    A listing of each account a company owns, along with the account ...
  5. Operating Cost

    Expenses associated with administering a business on a day to ...
  6. Capital Expenditure (CAPEX)

    Funds used by a company to acquire or upgrade physical assets ...
RELATED FAQS
  1. How is minimum transfer price calculated?

    A company that transfers goods between multiple divisions needs to establish a transfer price so that each division can track ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What is the effective interest method of amortization?

    The effective interest method is an accounting practice used for discounting a bond. This method is used for bonds sold at ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What does an unfavorable variance indicate to management?

    In managerial accounting, an unfavorable variance is discovered when a company's management performs a comparison between ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. Is there a way to include intangible assets in book-to-market ratio calculations?

    The book-to-market ratio is used in fundamental analysis to identify whether a company's securities are overvalued or undervalued. ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What are some of the limitations and drawbacks of using a payback period for analysis?

    Limitations, or disadvantages, of using the payback period method in capital budgeting include the fact that it fails to ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. What are common concepts and techniques of managerial accounting?

    The common concepts and techniques of managerial accounting are all the concepts and techniques that surround planning and ... Read Full Answer >>
Related Articles
  1. Investing

    Earnings: Quality Means Everything

    It's quantity that generates all the hype, but there are more meaningful factors that gauge true performance.
  2. Personal Finance

    Top 8 Ways Companies Cook The Books

    Find out more about the fraudulent accounting methods some companies use to fool investors.
  3. Budgeting

    Managing Income During Retirement

    Learn some sensible strategies for making your hard-earned savings last for as long as you need them.
  4. Fundamental Analysis

    Understanding Pro-Forma Earnings

    These figures can either shed light on a company's performance or skew it. Find out why.
  5. Retirement

    The Essentials Of Corporate Cash Flow

    Tune out the accounting noise and see whether a company is generating the stuff it needs to sustain itself.
  6. Investing

    How To Evaluate Pension Risk By Analyzing Annual Costs

    Learn how to assess whether a company's pension plan is posing more risks than what the footnotes indicate.
  7. Budgeting

    The Adverse Effects of Cheap Gas

    While low gas prices are welcomed, smart budgeters must anticipate future price hikes and consider the impact of low gas prices on investments and taxes.
  8. Chart Advisor

    3 Ways To Trade The Bounce In Coal

    News from the Supreme Court has caused active traders to turn their attention to the coal markets. We'll take a look at how to trade the bounce.
  9. Investing Basics

    Calculating Unlevered Free Cash Flow

    Unlevered free cash flow (UFCF) is the free cash flow of a business before interest payments.
  10. Taxes

    Understanding Write-Offs

    Write-off has different meanings depending on the context in which it is used, but generally refers to a reduction in value due to expense or loss.

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. National Currency

    The currency or legal tender issued by a nation's central bank or monetary authority. The national currency of a nation is ...
  2. Treasury Yield

    The return on investment, expressed as a percentage, on the debt obligations of the U.S. government. Treasuries are considered ...
  3. Bund

    A bond issued by Germany's federal government, or the German word for "bond." Bunds are the German equivalent of U.S. Treasury ...
  4. European Central Bank - ECB

    The central bank responsible for the monetary system of the European Union (EU) and the euro currency. The bank was formed ...
  5. Quantitative Easing

    An unconventional monetary policy in which a central bank purchases private sector financial assets in order to lower interest ...
  6. Current Account Deficit

    A measurement of a country’s trade in which the value of goods and services it imports exceeds the value of goods and services ...
Trading Center
×

You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!