Current Cost of Supplies - CCS

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DEFINITION of 'Current Cost of Supplies - CCS'

This refers to the net income of a company after taking into account the increase (or decrease) in expenses over the reporting period. It is typically used by commodity reliant businesses.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Current Cost of Supplies - CCS'

You will quite often find this term used in the energy industry because the price of oil can change so much from one year to the next.

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