Canadian Deposit Insurance Corporation - CDIC


DEFINITION of 'Canadian Deposit Insurance Corporation - CDIC '

A crown corporation owned by the Canadian government that insures bank deposits up to C$100,000 per personal account held in member Canadian banks in they event that the financial institution fails. The corporation was formed under the Financial Administration Act and Canada Deposit Insurance Corporation Act in 1967. The CDIC is similar to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation in the United States.

BREAKING DOWN 'Canadian Deposit Insurance Corporation - CDIC '

Between 1967 and 2008, Canada experience the failure of 43 financial instutions, all of which were CDIC member banks. When using a bank in either in the United States or Canada, FDIC or CDIC membership is important to consider, as it provides depositors with some insurance against losing their savings.

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  3. Ontario Securities Commission - ...

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  5. Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation ...

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    A financial institution licensed as a receiver of deposits. There ...
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