Certified Consumer Debt Specialist - CCDS

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DEFINITION of 'Certified Consumer Debt Specialist - CCDS'

A professional designation awarded by the Center for Financial Certifications to debt settlement professionals who pass a certification exam. Successful applicants earn the right to use the CCDS designation with their names, which can improve job opportunities, professional reputation and pay. Every two years, CCDS professionals must complete 20 hours of continuing education and pay a fee to retain the designation.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Certified Consumer Debt Specialist - CCDS'

CCDS applicants study debt settlement and personal finance management (including budgeting, evaluating debt loads, setting and achieving financial goals, planning to eliminate/avoid debt, investing, retirement and insurance). Also, applicants must develop communication, counseling and negotiation skills to negotiate on behalf of their clients. CCDS professionals should also be familiar with consumer protection laws.



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