Certified Forensic Financial Analyst - CFFA

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DEFINITION of 'Certified Forensic Financial Analyst - CFFA'

A specialized accounting credential offered by the Financial Forensics Institute indicating specialized training and credibility in financial forensics. Within the CFFA credential, there are five further levels of specialization: financial litigation, forensic accounting, business and intellectual property damages, business fraud and matrimonial litigation.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Certified Forensic Financial Analyst - CFFA'

The CFFA designation can be important to legal and business users of financial forensic services. Requirement for obtaining and maintaining the CFFA designation include education or credentials, work experience, professional references, specialized training, an 8-hour exam and ongoing education. CFFAs and prospective CFFAs must also maintain active membership in the National Association of Certified Valuation Analysts (NACVA).



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