Certified Fraud Examiner - CFE

DEFINITION of 'Certified Fraud Examiner - CFE'

A professional certification available to fraud examiners. The certified fraud examiner (CFE) title can be obtained with a rigorous application process followed by a comprehensive board exam. CFE certificants are thoroughly trained to investigate, identify and prevent both legal and financial crime and fraud. They are subject to periodic continuing education requirements in the same manner as CPAs and CFPs.

BREAKING DOWN 'Certified Fraud Examiner - CFE'

The CFE designation is issued by the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners. This organization is the world's largest anti-fraud organization and requires all members to carry the CFE credential. The association now has over 50,000 members (as of 2010), and is based in Austin, Texas.

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