Certified Insolvency And Reorganization Accountant - CIRA

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DEFINITION of 'Certified Insolvency And Reorganization Accountant - CIRA'

A professional certification available to forensic accountants. To become certified, candidates must pass a rigorous board exam. The CIRA designation provides both additional training and professional recognition for certficants.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Certified Insolvency And Reorganization Accountant - CIRA'

CIRA candidates must have previous experience with both insolvency and reorganization accounting. The exam is broken down into three parts. The first is financial reporting and taxes, the second is managing turnaround and bankruptcies and the final part involves plan development and accounting.

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