Certified Internal Auditor - CIA

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DEFINITION of 'Certified Internal Auditor - CIA'

A certification offered to accountants who conduct internal audits. Certified Internal Auditors (CIA) must meet several requirements to obtain this designation, such as passing a four-part exam that covers all issues, risks and remedies that pertain to internal audits. The Certified Internal Auditor designation is conferred by the Institute of Internal Auditors (IIA) and is the only such credential that is accepted worldwide.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Certified Internal Auditor - CIA'

The first three parts of the CIA exam focus on core global elements of internal audits. The fourth part covers auditing issues specific to the region in which the student is located. Although the IIA offers this credential, it is not needed to be a member of the organization.

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