Cash Flow After Taxes - CFAT

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DEFINITION of 'Cash Flow After Taxes - CFAT'

A measure of financial performance that looks at the company's ability to generate cash flow through its operations. It is calculated by adding back non-cash accounts such as amortization, depreciation, restructuring costs and impairments to net income.

Cash Flow After Taxes (CFAT)



Also known as "After-Tax Cash Flow".

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Cash Flow After Taxes - CFAT'

CFAT is important for investors because it gauges a corporation's ability to pay dividends. The higher the CFAT, the better positioned a business is to make distributions. CFAT also measures the company's financial health and performance over time and in comparison to competitors.

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