Capital Goods Price Index - CGPI


DEFINITION of 'Capital Goods Price Index - CGPI'

An economic index computed by the New Zealand government that measures the change in fixed capital-asset prices in the New Zealand economy from one period to another. The index helps indicate the change in costs for capital assets, which are used by companies and the New Zealand government to produce other goods. The CGPI is produced every quarter.

BREAKING DOWN 'Capital Goods Price Index - CGPI'

The index monitors changes in six types of physical capital assets: residential and nonresidential buildings, transportation equipment, land-improvement costs, plant machinery and other types of construction.

  1. Capital Expenditure (CAPEX)

    Capital expenditure, or CapEx, are funds used by a company to ...
  2. Capital Asset

    A type of asset that is not easily sold in the regular course ...
  3. NZD

    In the currency market, this is the abbreviation for the New ...
  4. Capital Goods

    1. Any tangible assets that an organization uses to produce goods ...
  5. Capital Budgeting

    The process in which a business determines whether projects such ...
  6. Put-Call Parity

    A principle that defines the relationship between the price of ...
Related Articles
  1. Options & Futures

    Explaining The World Through Macroeconomic Analysis

    From unemployment and inflation to government policy, learn what macroeconomics measures and how it affects everyone.
  2. Retirement

    Economic Indicators To Know

    The economy has a large impact on the market. Learn how to interpret the most important reports.
  3. Budgeting

    Your Worst Financial Mistakes And Why You Made Them

    No one intends to make a financial mistake, but an unexpected disaster or poor planning could leave you in financial distress.
  4. Stock Analysis

    Don't Be Fooled by the Market's Recent Rally

    The bulls won for a bit in early October, but will bears have the last laugh?
  5. Bonds & Fixed Income

    An Assessment of High Yield Corporate Bond Credit Spreads

    A credit risk literature review.
  6. Personal Finance

    4 Ways Simple Interest Is Used In Real Life

    Simple interest works in your favor when you're a borrower, but against you when you're an investor.
  7. Investing

    Is it Time to “Buy” Inflation?

    Based on recent data from the Treasury-Inflation Protected Securities (TIPS) market, it would seem that most investors aren’t worried about inflation.
  8. Investing

    What a Fed Delay Means for the ECB & BoJ

    The Fed’s continued delay has repercussions for more than just the U.S. economy and markets. The ECB and the BoJ may support the case for stocks in Europe.
  9. Investing

    How Worried Should We Be About China?

    An economic slowdown, a freezing up in trade and plunging markets and currencies are casting a shadow across Asia—and the globe. How worried should we be?
  10. Technical Indicators

    Explaining Autocorrelation

    Autocorrelation is the measure of an internal correlation with a given time series.
  1. What is the utility function and how is it calculated?

    In economics, utility function is an important concept that measures preferences over a set of goods and services. Utility ... Read Full Answer >>
  2. What economic indicators are important to consider when investing in the retail sector?

    The unemployment rate and Consumer Confidence Index (CCI) rank as two of the most important economic indicators to consider ... Read Full Answer >>
  3. What types of expenses are factored into autonomous consumption?

    Autonomous consumption is the level of consumption necessary to support everyday life in a zero-income scenario. Put another ... Read Full Answer >>
  4. How can I use a regression to see the correlation between prices and interest rates?

    In statistics, regression analysis is a widely used technique to uncover relationships among variables and determine whether ... Read Full Answer >>
  5. What are some of the key shortcomings of how the U.S. unemployment rate is determined ...

    Each month, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), a division of the U.S. Department of Labor, announces the unemployment ... Read Full Answer >>
  6. Why would a country's gross domestic product (GDP) and gross national income (GNI) ...

    A country’s gross domestic product, or GDP, and gross national income, or GNI, are likely to differ considerably because ... Read Full Answer >>

You May Also Like

Hot Definitions
  1. Ex Works (EXW)

    An international trade term requiring the seller to make goods ready for pickup at his or her own place of business. All ...
  2. Letter of Intent - LOI

    A document outlining the terms of an agreement before it is finalized. LOIs are usually not legally binding in their entirety. ...
  3. Purchasing Power

    The value of a currency expressed in terms of the amount of goods or services that one unit of money can buy. Purchasing ...
  4. Real Estate Investment Trust - REIT

    A REIT is a type of security that invests in real estate through property or mortgages and often trades on major exchanges ...
  5. Section 1231 Property

    A tax term relating to depreciable business property that has been held for over a year. Section 1231 property includes buildings, ...
  6. Term Deposit

    A deposit held at a financial institution that has a fixed term, and guarantees return of principal.
Trading Center
You are using adblocking software

Want access to all of Investopedia? Add us to your “whitelist”
so you'll never miss a feature!