Capital Goods Price Index - CGPI

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DEFINITION of 'Capital Goods Price Index - CGPI'

An economic index computed by the New Zealand government that measures the change in fixed capital-asset prices in the New Zealand economy from one period to another. The index helps indicate the change in costs for capital assets, which are used by companies and the New Zealand government to produce other goods. The CGPI is produced every quarter.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Capital Goods Price Index - CGPI'

The index monitors changes in six types of physical capital assets: residential and nonresidential buildings, transportation equipment, land-improvement costs, plant machinery and other types of construction.

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