Chamber Of Commerce

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DEFINITION of 'Chamber Of Commerce'

An association of businessmen and businesswomen designed to promote and protect the interests of its members. There is a national Chamber of Commerce, as well as numerous state and local chambers. Among the benefits members receive are deals and discounts from other chamber members, listing in a member directory and a variety of other programs and services designed to promote business activity in a region.

INVESTOPEDIA EXPLAINS 'Chamber Of Commerce'

Chambers of commerce play an important role in local municipalities in promoting business activity and representing chamber members. At least at the local level, chamber of commerce members often meet to discuss and attempt to shape policy that relates to the business and overall economic environment. Members also receive the distinction of being a preferred local vendor, as well as listing on various municipal websites and literature.

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